By Cari Cole

 

 

The music industry has, and still does, operate mostly behind closed doors. Perhaps from not wanting to reveal their secrets or new strategies to competitors, or being just too darn busy carving a path for their artists, the companies with success keep a tight lid on it. Artists, industry and music lovers grab the after facts as it dribbles out into music industry press — as success stories pepper the likes of trade rags, popular blogs and Wikipedia pages.

 

Over the past 30 years as a celebrity vocal coach, songwriter, producer, then artist developer and now a private A & R and music publishing company, I now know, what as an artist, I failed to realize. And it’s important. Because knowing it, would have made a world of difference — it would have made things happen for me then and could make things happen for you now.

 

The important thing, is to take that knowledge and insider access and bring it as many artists as we can. So that each of you have the benefit of a birds eye view into how the business ticks and moves.

 

As Mary J. Blige said so simply but profoundly, “The music industry is no place for people who don’t know things” — nothing could possibly be more true. But the sad fact, is that, knowing these things, is nearly impossible without an insiders seat. Without access to people that are inside the industry, the ones making things happen, artists stay on the outside looking in wishfully hoping that one day, the flood gates will open.

 

Here are my top 4 Things About the Music Business That Will Change Everything — and could seriously change your course trajectory and even get you a seat at the table – the one you really want.

 

 1.  The Music Business is Not Here to Help You

 

This seems weird, but even if you are amazingly talented, it doesn’t mean that anyone is going to help you. Sigh. It is a huge mistake to think that talent is all you need. Nope. You’ve got to have more than that. You’ve got to have smarts, or find people who do. And if you’re far enough to have a manager, then get one, asap. Keep your hand out until someone says yes. If you’re not getting a good response, then your music or brand is not right yet, period. Talent is everything, but not the reason you’ll make it.

 

2.  Just ‘Cause You’re Not Turning Heads Now, Doesn’t Mean You Won’t Be

 

Every artist has their own evolution in the business. Some are early bloomers, some are late bloomers, and some are in-between bloomers. Don’t let it surprise or discourage you. Never give up ever. Your home in music is waiting for you. I’ve seen mediocre talent become extraordinary. I’ve seen exceptional talent rise and fall late in their career. It’s all about how determined and willing you are.

 

3.  It’s Always You, Never Them

 

A well known artist said this to me once and it stuck like glue. “It’s never about the music industry, it’s always about you.” We were talking about how it’s easy for artists to get in their own way. Particularly when they are operating in a vacuum without feedback or a community. Artists tend to create in isolation, but don’t let that be your standard practice or you might end up in left field, alone, counting the unsold records in your basement. And never forget, you’ve got to give to get. Don’t hold on to 100% copyright if there are deals on the table. 0 percent of 0 is 0.

 

Why Not's

 

4.  Reasons Are Excuses

 

Maybe you sell yourself short by settling for less than you are. Maybe you are afraid to go for it, lest you fail. Maybe you think you’re too fat, too young, too old, too mediocre. Every single one of those reasons is just an excuse. Expose your reasons and turn them into fuel. Your future is at stake. You can do this.

 

Want more? I’m continuing the conversation and doing a bigger reveal on our upcoming online free training… Click here to grab a seat,,, it’s going to be a real eye opener!!

 

 

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